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Junior+Oscar+Cabrera%27s+mother+and+grandmother+walking+around+his+grandfathers+ranch+in+mexico
Junior Oscar Cabrera's mother and grandmother walking around his grandfathers ranch in mexico

Junior Oscar Cabrera's mother and grandmother walking around his grandfathers ranch in mexico

Oscar Cabrera

Oscar Cabrera

Junior Oscar Cabrera's mother and grandmother walking around his grandfathers ranch in mexico

Olivia Perron, Staff Writer

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Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) is in limbo with making it recipients wonder if they will be in the U.S. much longer. After spending their life in the States before age 16, these individuals may be sent back to a place they don’t call home. Founded by Barack Obama in 2012, DACA protects some immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children from immediate deportation.

“DACA is the visa for the [illegal] kids of the parents who have come legally to the US.” junior Oscar Cabrera said.

Being granted DACA does not give an individual citizenship. The program  helps its recipients work permits, in the U.S., but it is threatened to be repealed by the government by the end of this year.

Cabrera came to the U.S. 5 years ago after living in Queretaro, Mexico. He was able to come to Troy after spending over a year going through the process to get a visa. Cabrera says that the DACA program is beneficial for the U.S. because it allows recipients to continue living the only life they can remember.

“DACA is a good thing because it helps people to be legal here in the United States,” Cabrera said. “All the people who are a part of DACA are being helped. They just want to keep the life they have been living for so long.”

Like Cabrera, junior Jessica Mendoza Diaz, Born in Guatemala, she moved to the U.S. in 2009.

Coming to the U.S. to find a better life, Mendoza Diaz was concerned about risk of deportation from the new country. Her biggest worry was learning English but her mom helped her learn.

Coming to the U.S. to find a better life, Mendoza Diaz was concerned about risk of deportation from the new country. Her biggest worry was learning English but her mom helped her learn

“In all, it’s great being here, but it is scary to know that one day we could be sent home to a place we might not call home. Mendoza Diaz said. This place is my home, not there .”

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